Sharing a little good news today

During these trying times, we are all together in searching for explanations for the coronavirus and answers for our families. 

Seems there are more questions than answers.

How long before our country reopens? How long do we stay in self-isolation? Can we get back to work soon at our regular workstations?

On the other hand, we know that there is some good news underlying all this.  The doctors, nurses, and medical specialists are working tirelessly to serve those who are suffering, and we can be thankful.  Researchers are finding new promises for the treatment and prevention of the dread disease.

We sometimes take a lighter view of changing habits and recommendations for our part in keeping the virus at bay.

How many times each day do we hear or say “wash your hands?”  How often have we said “keep your distance” to a friend or family member? Or this lockdown is causing “cabin fever!”

The sharing of a little good news today probably relates more to the cabin fever experience.  It originated with a news release from the folks at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park.

You may have read the news a few days ago: “Cumberland Gap National Historical Park Increasing Recreational Access to All Park Trails.”

There are more than 80 miles of trails in the park.  Some are more strenuous than others, of course; some are quite easy with little or no elevation gain.  So, plan accordingly, especially if the very young or the older members of your family want to escape to the outdoors.

Tri-state residents are fortunate to have a great national park almost next door.  And, as we struggle with the crisis facing all of us, now seems to be a good time get out with the family and “de-stress.”

Trails in the park are easily accessible:  In Kentucky, from Visitor Center parking area, Thomas Walker parking area, Dark Ridge overlook, and Shillalah Creek trailhead. In Tennessee, from Iron Furnace area.  In Virginia, from Colson Lane on US 58 and Chadwell Gap.

Why not share a little good news today, and get ready to take a hike.

William H. Baker is a Claiborne County native and former Middlesboro resident. Email w.baker@ limestone.edu.